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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a building behind right where i am. it's a complex where we understand there are some government offices, and we understand from other palestinian sources that some of the security personnel who were vacated from other areas, other offices around gaza, may have been working out of that building. so certainly there wa
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and she is set to sit down with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> no claim of responsibility on that bus explosion yet but word is that hamas has blessed the attacks. we go to ben wedeman for more on that. >> reporter: what we heard from a nearby mosque is an announcement saying that, quote, unquote, lions from the west bank had carried out that attack in tel aviv. there was also the suggestion in that announcement from the mosque that hamas was somehow responsible for that attack. however, the television affiliated with the hamas movement said yes, they did bless that attack but said it was a, quote, unquote, natural reaction to israel's offensive against the gaza strip. so, there has been no claim of responsibility by hamas or by anybody else at this point regarding that attack. now there was some scattered celebratory gunfire in gaza after news of the attack in tel aviv. i'm not aware of anybody handing out candy. it's important to stress that not everybody supports hamas in the gaza strip. and there are many people who are unhappy with the
president mahmoud abbas and with egyptian president mohammed morsi tomorrow. i want to bring in cnn's wolf blitzer, who is live for us in jerusalem tonight, and anderson cooper and ben wedeman, both in gaza city. wolf, let me start with you if i may. a very tense day with claim and counterclaim coming almost on an hourly basis. there was going to be a cease-fire, then no cease-fire. both sides trading sort of insults and then offering fig leaves. what do you make of it all? as we talk now in the middle of a night there, what do you make of where we really are with this? >> well, throughout most of the day, i thought they were very close to reaching a cease-fire agreement. all the signs looked rather positive. then all of a sudden, on this day, it was getting increasingly more tense in the southern part of israel and what we've been seeing in gaza, very, very bloody as well. you wouldn't know that they are apparently rather close to some sort of a deal, that the egyptian government, the new president, mohammed morsi, seemed to be brokering. they may still get some sort of cease-fire agreeme
the hamas leadership and the egyptian government of the new president, mohamed morsi, who, himself, is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. there is a new gee rhregime in right now. they went out of their way to praise morsi for his role now. there could be an improvement in israeli-egyptian relations if this agreement holds. that's a big if right now. we'll see what happens in the coming hours. we're watching it closely. >> ben wedeman, egypt has a role in basically monitoring developments and has a responsibility now according to this agreement, the parameters of the cease-fire. egypt, will they be able to stop smuggling of hamas weapons through those tunnels, from egypt into gaza city? because there is a lot of concern obviously on the israeli side of the border that hamas will use any kind of a cease-fire, use any stopping of violence to basically replenish their stockpile of weapons. >> really is up to the political will of the egyptian leadership to make sure this happens. we have seen it in the past that the egyptians will sort of tighten and loosen their hold on gaza when th
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
times called egypt's new president mohamed morsi to ask what it would take to stop the violence. mr. obama then sent secretary of state clinton to the middle east. the violence in gaza has forced the administration back into the middleman role it seemed to abandon last year when two years of work by middle east special envoy george mitchell came up empty. but now under the threat of war the u.s. sees little choice except to step in. secretary clinton will ask the palestinians to stop the rocket attacks and ask israel to offer more hope of a longer term peace agreement. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of the israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: the crucial player now is president morsi of egypt whose islamist government openly supports hamas because the u.s. and israel see hamas as a terrorist organization, morsi is essentially the go-between. this is new ground for both the president and the secretary of state. regional and popular support for hamas and the palestinians has never bee
will head to cairo where she'll have face-to-face meetings with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> want to begin with reza sayah, live for us in cairo. she mentioned in her comments that she is on her way to have meetings with the egyptian president, morsi, at the same time, offering any assistance that israel might need. tell me a little bit about the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israe
and around the world because president morsi is new. he's from the muslim brotherhood. a lot of question marks about whether he can really be trusted. you'll remember back in the day, former egyptian president, hosni mubarak, far from perfect, but seen as an honest broker in these talks, and somebody who is a pillar in trying to bring all sides together. what's interesting is that today president morsi was saying the right things about how he was trying to bring together the parties for a cease fire. but that came two days after republicans on capitol hill threatened to take away u.s. aid unless he played a more constructive role. take a listen. >> egypt, watch what you do and how you do it. you're teetering with the congress on having your aid cut off if you keep inciting violence between the israelis and the palestinians. >> remember as well, it was only two months ago that president obama told television interviewer that he didn't believe egypt was an ally anymore, that raised a lot of eyebrows at the time. but today we're told the president has now spoken to president morsi three tim
with mahmoud abbas and president morsi in israel. what are you hearing about the talks with netanyahu? >> they met about two hours with netanyahu, the defense minister, foreign minister, national security team. they spent two hours, the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position of all issues. she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on, she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now throughout the day, there is speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire. israelis downplaying the possibility. saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. no agreement, and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling of southern israel today by hamas and an intelligence fiction of israeli attacks in gaza, witnessed by what happened to you guys what you saw over the past hour or two in gaza city. the negotiations will continue tomorrow, hillary clinton as you point out, going to ramallah to meet with palestinian authority leaders a
, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was leaning towards accepting this draft proposal sent by hamas via the egyptian government. so once it was c
power. mohamed morsi decreed that all his decisions are final and not subject to appeal or review. he also ordered the retrial of former president hosni mubarak for the killing of protesters during the revolution. some egyptians protested morsi's action today, accusing him and the muslim brotherhood of seizing too much power. president obama spent the holiday at the white house. he phoned 10 american service men and women in afghanistan to thank them for their sacrifice. at a u.s. base in kabul, troops feasted on 200 turkeys and the trimmings. about 66,000 americans are still deployed in afghanistan. most are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. sharyl attkisson in washington has more on that tonight. sharyl. >> reporter: ambassador rice defended her comment from more than nine weeks a
opposition rally against president morsi there. escalating violence is spreading across the city and much of egypt really for the last five days ever since the president's controversial decree granting himself nearance sew lieutenant power. that is a move many critics say is veiled attempt to turn egypt back into dictatorship. others say morsi is attempting to clean out the old guard and reaffirm a brand new move to a new government in egypt. something we're watching closely in the middle east. with pressure growing last night, morsi sat down last night with a five-hour meeting with the country's senior judges in an attempt he says to diffuse the situation but refused calls to withdraw the decree. >>> there is new push on capitol hill to stop the environmental protection agency from moving forward with a plan to impose stricter oil and gas regulations which opponents say will only cause more pain at the pump and drive a gal ghoul lon of regular -- gallon of regular gasoline higher than what you see on the screen. peter barnes is with us with more on this. this isn't just about gas prices.
. that would be a big test for vernment morsi, the morsi government and brother the muslim brotherhood as a broker legitimate broker in the region.nk and i think there's some hope that that could come together. also but also at the same time a lotlot of of discomfort.it. >> john, i'm struck by how much the egyptian president has been resident engaged with president obama, president obama calling him reportedly three times from air force one.usly obviously secretary clinton has landed in cairo this morning. how critical is egypt's role? do you think there will be a ceasefire by the end of the day? >> i tried not to make predictions like that. to vale's role is critical. it's a test as to whether they broker can be accepted as an honest broker in the region.ities. one of the fascinating things here is the people. you have mohammed shehada, now the head of egyptian inte h generals. he's not a morsi guy, per se. morsi morsi promoted him. he he goes back to the mubarak me. regime. israelis have a relationship with him. they have dealt with him in secret. he was the broker w
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank
, will the celebrations ends and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hilary clinton and president morsi, the hope is that the deal will stick. it calls for freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza and a commitment not to target militants and commitment from militant groups in gaza, to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion nothing is a done deal. over the next hour, we'll look at negotiations still happening now, we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and the leader much hamas. plus, a reporter on the ground and whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over the last 24 hours, and it's remarkable there is a cease-fire at this hour when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. at mid day, no sign of a truce when a city bus is bombed in tell aviv, two dozen people twounded. terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised attack, near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces. farther south, an israeli home hit by a rocket. room after room, left in ruins. according to the is
? will the celebrations end and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and morsi, the agreement calls for discussion on a number of issues, including freedom of movement for palestinians, in and out of gaza. and the agreement not to target the area in gaza, and to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion, nothing is a done deal. over the next hour we'll look at the negotiations still happening now. we'll also hear from the spokesperson for the israeli defense forces, and the leader of hamas, plus, the reporters on the ground, and we'll look at what transpired over the last 24 hours. it is remarkable there was a cease-fire this hour, when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. at mid-day, no sign of a truce yet when a city bus is bombed in tel aviv. at least two dozen were wounded. israeli police say hamas left the bombs on the bus. only one exploded. hamas praised the attack, but the group didn't claim responsibility. farther south, an israeli home was hit by a rocket, room after room, left in ruins. according to the military, more than 60 rockets wer
.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and mohammed morsi who pushed for a cease fire, the agreement calls for discussion of a number of issues, including freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza. and the agreement not to target the area in gaza, and to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion, nothing is a done deal. over the next hour we'll look at the negotiations still happening now. we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and from the leader of hamas. plus our reporters on the ground and a whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over just the last 24 hours. it is remarkable there was a cease-fire this hour, when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. add midday, no sign of a truce yet when a city bus is bombed in tel-aviv. at least two dozen were wounded. israeli police say terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised the attack near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces but the group didn't claim responsibility. farther south in israeli a home was hit
. >> white house criticizing president morsi. would you say that was incorrect statement? >> i would say that we are concerned about it and raised those concerns are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may
and will meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi later today. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advance the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as critical to any peace deal. his muslim brotherhood is hamas' parent organization but egypt also has close ties to america and relies heavily on u.s. aid. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> many journalists covering the conflict are caught in the middle. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel early this morning. the israeli military launched dozens of air strikes. he tweeted that he and his colleagues are okay. >>> 5:09. the man who shot and killed two people at the richmond/san rafael bridge toll plaza laughed while receiving his death sentence in court yesterday. a contra costa county jury contributed for two days before determining that nathan burris should receive the death penalty. during the trial he frequently mocked the victims' families. >> i can never forgive him
was the first administration official to meet egypt's president, mohamed morsi, after his historic election. and now by elevating him to peace broker the u.s. is supporting a young islamist president who has struggled to consolidate control of his own country. >> did the u.s. have to make any deals or concessions to make this happen? >> peace comes with a price. morsi's help here is going to get egypt around $450 million in emergency cash. congress may release those funds in the coming weeks, according to administration source. house appropriations committee froze that money in september after the president had already pledged it. the white house is also going to ask congress to increase financing for israel's iron dome defense system. the u.s. gave israel about $3 billion in military financing this year. so the big picture an official at state tells me that this effort was about stopping the killing, not launching a mideast peace process for the obama administration. a senior israeli official told me give it one to two more days before you call this an agreement. isra
-fire deal brokered largely over the phone. president obama and the president of egypt, mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. i want to begin our coverage here of the very fragile truce with arwa damon live with us this morning in gaza city. arwa, i think i hear horns honking. is the celebration there continuing where you are? >> reporter: it is. although the crowds have tapered off a little bit. but it is pretty incredible when you look at the street down below us and compare it to what the situation was like 24 hours ago, when you would hardly see a single person outside and most of the shops were shut. you can see very close to where people were gathering, celebrating what they're calling a victory. just one of the many locations that were bombed during this most recent conflict. that was, in fact, a residential home. the israelis, when they struck it later on, saying that they believe that it was being used by a senior hamas commander as an intelligence operations center. but people, ever since the cease-fire was announced, were taking to the stre
morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chan egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated with an islamist government. but there are some shady things about the deal. according to an israeli newspaper, neither side officially signed penned to paper on the cease-fire agreement which raise sometimes questions about it. and here's what we know is in the verbal deal. israel has agreed to hold its fire and end attacks against top militants and this is important, promise to look at ways to ease its blockade of the gaza border. hamas agreed not to strike any israeli targets and agreed there is no passage of weapons into gaza and to insure other palestinian groups in the gaza strip stop their attacks. if you're shaking your head that some of these things are very tall order, well, you're right. later "out front" we have the key players, israel's foreign deputy minister and leerd of the plo to the united states. they will be our guests and answer those questions. but cnn's ben wheatamen is live with the latest
-fire deal brokered largely by president obama and mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. we'll have our coverage of the cease-fire with arwa damon, who's live this morning for us in gaza. and arwa, we see the flags flying, the honking, the streets lined with cars. is it still the same situation right now? >> reporter: it most certainly is. we can give you an idea of what the street below us looks like, as masses of people following thursday midday prayers here are gathering in front of one of the government buildings. we've been hearing the speeches, listening to the messages coming from the loud speakers as well. people very much declaring this a victory, although this is a city and a population that most certainly has paid an incredibly heavy price. just to give you an idea, next to where the crowds are gathering down this main road in gaza city are the remains of what was once a residential home that was attacked a few days ago. we were here when that strike took place. it was massive. it shook the entire neighborhood. and so whilst on the one hand people
clinton is now in egypt. she's meeting with egyptian president mohammed morsi, trying to help come up with a cease agreement to stop all of the violence in egypt and gaza. egypt has played a very important role between israel and the palestinians. >>> and arson investigators are checking out a suspicious fire in investigation. it happened earlier this morning. firefighters rushed to a scene just before 5:00 a.m. this morning, put the fire out quickly. but four cars were torched in this carport. luckily, no one was hurt. >>> 8:46. some of san francisco's bravest officials will test out their turkey-carving skills this morning. tam joins us live to tell us all about the event and it is about giving back to thanksgiving -- tara moriarty joins us live to tell us all about the event and it is about giving back this thanksgiving. >> reporter: that's right. joining me live is the police chief, greg sur. why are you doing this? it's our chance to give back. we're able to help people all year long. this is the chance to put the meat on the table. the salvation army is great. their turkeys are
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)